Finds

Found 41 Items

MOLA Headland finds specialist arranges finds ready for x-ray (c) Highways England courtesy of MOLA Headland
How are x-rays helping archaeologists identify finds from A14C2H?
February 21, 2019

X-rays are a non-destructive way of exploring metal archaeological finds in more detail. They allow our finds specialists to reveal the true form of heavily corroded items and get a glimpse of the very fabric of an object, meaning they can better understand how it was made, its condition and…

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Fired clay loom weights (c) Highways England courtesy of MOLA Headland Infrastructure
Archaeological finds: A human connection to the Cambridgeshire landscape through time
October 10, 2018

Once finds have been carefully lifted from the ground, they immediately begin their journey through the post-ex process. We carefully bag and label them, which means that when they arrive at our processing facilities, we still know exactly which layer they came from or which feature they were found in…

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Samian ware decorated with lion fight scene (c) Highways England courtesy of MOLA Headland Infrastructure
A potted history of Cambridgeshire: Ceramic finds from the A14C2H
September 26, 2018

Excavations for the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon Improvement Scheme have produced enormous quantities of pottery – nearly four tons, in fact, at our last estimate! Over the coming year, MOLA Headland Pottery Specialist Adam Sutton and a team of 9 other experts will sort through these finds and figure out…

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Correct numbering and labelling of bag contents is essential (c) A14C2H courtesy of MOLA Headland Infrastructure
Ask the expert: Finds Supervisor
April 18, 2018

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Neolithic flint axe-head (c) Highways England, courtesy of MOLA Headland Infrastructure_preview
Our favourite finds so far: A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon
April 4, 2018

Some beautiful and unusual objects have been found during archaeological work for the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon improvement scheme. They range from a prehistoric jet ear-stud to a delightful Saxon (5th to early 11th century AD) bone flute.

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Murder they croaked? Investigating a prehistoric frog mystery on the A14
July 8, 2022

Archaeology is not just the study of past human activity. It also looks at the animals that inhabited ancient landscapes. During excavations on the National Highways A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon Road Improvement Scheme we retrieved more than four tonnes of animal bones, which we are now studying in detail.  Our…

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Volunteers reveal the lives of six Londoners buried in St James’s Burial Ground
March 3, 2022

People from all walks of life were buried at St James’s Burial Ground, rich and poor, young and old. The cemetery was used from 1790 to 1843, during a time when London was expanding quickly. It struggled to deal with London’s increasing population and closed to new burials earlier than…

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Radiographs of Iron Age and Roman jars
X-rays grant vision into the past – What we found out X-raying ancient pottery from the A14 (and why we did it)
February 24, 2022

Excavations on the National Highways A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon Road Improvement Scheme may be complete, but we’re continuing to study the incredible amount of finds unearthed. Now, when you think about X-rays you probably imagine hospitals and airport security rather than archaeology and ancient pots. However, recently more than 100…

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Left: Lanah holding a pot, reconstructing its shape. Right: Jemma in hi-visibility clothing in the middle of a field.
Pots and metals along the A14 – Masters students reflect on their National Highways and MOLA Headland studentship
January 6, 2022

Back in 2020, Jemma Moorhouse and Lanah Hewson were each awarded an MA Scholarship funded by National Highways at Reading University. This included a placement to work with MOLA Headland on the archaeological excavations that formed part of the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon Road Improvement Scheme. Having now completed their…

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Become a citizen scientist and unlock the stories of St James’s Burial Ground
August 24, 2021

As part of our work on High Speed 2, we are inviting people to take part in a huge citizen science project – digitising 57,639 burial records that hold key details about the lives of Londoners in the 18th- and 19th-century.  Anyone can take part via the Stories of St James’s…

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