NEWS

Nifty neutrons – isotope analysis on the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon National Highways scheme02 Nov

(1) A cow tooth analysed to try and determine birthing seasons. (2) Bone samples demineralising in acid during the collagen extraction process.

Isotope analysis makes it possible to understand past environments and the human diet by using information taken from a single tooth, bone or plant grain. This revolutionary technique is being used by Professor Janet Montgomery and Dr Joanna Moore (of Durham University) on materials found during the A14 Cambridge to…


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Become a citizen scientist and unlock the stories of St James’s Burial Ground24 Aug

As part of our work on High Speed 2, we are inviting people to take part in a huge citizen science project – digitising 57,639 burial records that hold key details about the lives of Londoners in the 18th- and 19th-century.  Anyone can take part via the Stories of St James’s…


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Radiocarbon dating on the A14 Cambridge to Huntington Improvement Scheme17 May

Radiocarbon dating is a key tool that is allowing us to more precisely understand the chronology of archaeological sites and features across the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon improvement scheme. Over 400 radiocarbon samples have been sent to the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC), giving us dates for features such…


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‘What have the Romans ever done for us?’: the Roman Ceramic Revolution in Cambridgeshire18 Mar

A cross section diagram of a Roman updraught kiln showing the arrangement of a movable floor propped up on pilasters, on which pots would be stacked. Above ground level, a dome of clay and turf (not pictured) would insulate the load. A fire would then be set in the opening on the left (the ‘firebox’ or ‘flue’), the resulting heat being drawn up into the kiln by air currents.

The numerous archaeological surveys we have carried out on the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon improvement scheme have revealed a huge range of archaeology, dating from the earliest hunter-gatherers to the Second World War. Most recently, excavations by MOLA Headland Infrastructure have revealed new insights into the Roman Ceramic Revolution in…


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Fully-funded Highways England Master’s Studentships on the archaeology of the A14C2H07 Jan

Circular ‘henge’ monument thought to have been used as a ceremonial space (c) A14C2H courtesy of MOLA Headland Infrastructure

From July 2021 we will be welcoming two Archaeology Master’s Students to MOLA Headland Infrastructure as part of an exciting MA Studentship opportunity, funded by Highways England and delivered in conjunction with the University of Reading. The award-holders will spend the first 12 weeks of their programme (July-September 2021) on…


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Highways England and MOLA Headland provide learning opportunities for Archaeology Masters Students15 Dec

Metal finds from the A14 Cambridge to Huntington Improvement Scheme

“It sounds like everything I could have dreamed of” were the thoughts of Lanah Hewson when she applied for an exciting MA Studentship opportunity with MOLA Headland Infrastructure in January 2020. Six months later, Lanah and fellow Archaeology masters student and successful applicant, Jemma Moorhouse, had joined the company and…


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The road ahead: making sense of twelve thousand years of archaeology along the A14 in Cambridgeshire29 Sep

Aerial view of TEA38, an archaeological site on the A14 Cambridge to Huntington Improvement Scheme (c) HIghways England, courtesy of MOLA Headland Infrastructure

Our efforts to uncover the secrets of the Cambridgeshire countryside through the archaeology programme of the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon improvement scheme have reached an exciting stage. We have started the main phase of analysis, with a project team of over 70 people spread all over the country looking at…


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Heritage Open Days Webinar: HS2 Archaeological Findings at Park Street, Birmingham15 Sep

Date: Tuesday 15 September Time: 12:30 – 13:30 Price: Free  Location: Online webinar Did you know that one of the biggest archaeological digs in the UK has been taking place in Birmingham? A team of MOLA Headland archaeologists excavated the Park Street burial ground, close to Birmingham city centre. In…


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Dissecting the past: Park Street studies shed light on how student anatomists honed their skills19 Feb

Don Walker, Senior Human Osteologist for MOLA Headland Infrastructure, is one of a team of experts who have studied over 4,000 burials as part of post-excavation work at Park Street burial ground in Birmingham. This work was carried out for the design consultant WSP (in consortium with Ramboll) and Principal…


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Tracing lost Roman bath houses and ancient tile trade networks on the A14C2H scheme06 Jan

Aerial photo of A14 archaeological site (c) Highways England, courtesy of MOLA Headland Infrastructure

Now that excavations on the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon improvement scheme  are complete, it is over to our specialists to reveal the finer details and significance of what has been uncovered. In this blog, MOLA Headland specialist Ian Betts shares why tiles found near Offord Cluny may hint at a…


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