Excavation

Found 96 Items

Life, Death & Magic in Cambridgeshire
August 30, 2022

Public Talk: Life, Death & Magic in Cambridgeshire: Stories from the Later Prehistoric and Roman Artefacts found on the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon excavations Tuesday 13th September: 19:30 The Octagon, St Mary’s and All Saints Church, Church St, Willingham, Cambridge CB24 5HS From obscure objects to high end factory waste, fashionably…

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St Neots Living History Festival
August 30, 2022

Saturday 10 September: 1100-1600 The Square, Market Square, St. Neots, Cambridgeshire, PE19 2AR We’re taking part in St Neots Living History Festival ! Visit our stall to discover the story of the A14 excavations as part of this free family friendly event, packed full of history. No booking required. Additional information…

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Cromwell Museum Workshop Wednesdays: Discover Archaeology
August 18, 2022

Cromwell Museum Workshop Wednesdays Discover Archaeology Wednesday 24 August 2022, 12:00 – 16:00 Admission: £FREE Location: Huntingdon Town Hall and Market Square Explore archaeology in this jam-packed afternoon! Take part in drop-in activities, an archaeology workshop, and a talk by a real archaeozoologist about what they found while excavating the…

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Murder they croaked? Investigating a prehistoric frog mystery on the A14
July 8, 2022

Archaeology is not just the study of past human activity. It also looks at the animals that inhabited ancient landscapes. During excavations on the National Highways A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon Road Improvement Scheme we retrieved more than four tonnes of animal bones, which we are now studying in detail.  Our…

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Image showing line drawings of Neolithic worked flints. On the left are two leaf shaped arrowheads, showing front, back view and profile. On the right is a flaked axed, represented in front view, profile and bottom view.
What can stone tools tell us about prehistoric lives on the A14?
April 29, 2022

The further we travel back in time, the harder it becomes to read the traces left by our ancestors. While we have a wide variety of objects, buildings, and even written materials dating to our recent past, not as much survives from the Stone Age (c. 500,000-2200 BC). We have…

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Radiographs of Iron Age and Roman jars
X-rays grant vision into the past – What we found out X-raying ancient pottery from the A14 (and why we did it)
February 24, 2022

Excavations on the National Highways A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon Road Improvement Scheme may be complete, but we’re continuing to study the incredible amount of finds unearthed. Now, when you think about X-rays you probably imagine hospitals and airport security rather than archaeology and ancient pots. However, recently more than 100…

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Left: Lanah holding a pot, reconstructing its shape. Right: Jemma in hi-visibility clothing in the middle of a field.
Pots and metals along the A14 – Masters students reflect on their National Highways and MOLA Headland studentship
January 6, 2022

Back in 2020, Jemma Moorhouse and Lanah Hewson were each awarded an MA Scholarship funded by National Highways at Reading University. This included a placement to work with MOLA Headland on the archaeological excavations that formed part of the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon Road Improvement Scheme. Having now completed their…

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Become a citizen scientist and unlock the stories of St James’s Burial Ground
August 24, 2021

As part of our work on High Speed 2, we are inviting people to take part in a huge citizen science project – digitising 57,639 burial records that hold key details about the lives of Londoners in the 18th- and 19th-century.  Anyone can take part via the Stories of St James’s…

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A cross section diagram of a Roman updraught kiln showing the arrangement of a movable floor propped up on pilasters, on which pots would be stacked. Above ground level, a dome of clay and turf (not pictured) would insulate the load. A fire would then be set in the opening on the left (the ‘firebox’ or ‘flue’), the resulting heat being drawn up into the kiln by air currents.
‘What have the Romans ever done for us?’: the Roman Ceramic Revolution in Cambridgeshire
March 18, 2021

The numerous archaeological surveys we have carried out on the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon improvement scheme have revealed a huge range of archaeology, dating from the earliest hunter-gatherers to the Second World War. Most recently, excavations by MOLA Headland Infrastructure have revealed new insights into the Roman Ceramic Revolution in…

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Circular ‘henge’ monument thought to have been used as a ceremonial space (c) A14C2H courtesy of MOLA Headland Infrastructure
Fully-funded Highways England Master’s Studentships on the archaeology of the A14C2H
January 7, 2021

From July 2021 we will be welcoming two Archaeology Master’s Students to MOLA Headland Infrastructure as part of an exciting MA Studentship opportunity, funded by Highways England and delivered in conjunction with the University of Reading. The award-holders will spend the first 12 weeks of their programme (July-September 2021) on…

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